Spanish translation of the Yale Food Addiction rating Scale and, its evaluation in a Mexican population. A factorial analysis

Mariana Isabel Valdés-Moreno , María Cristina Rodríguez-Márquez , Juan José Cervantes-Navarrete , Beatriz Camarena , Patricia de Gortari

DOI: https://doi.org/10.17711/SM.0185-3325.2016.034

Abstract


Introduction. Obesity has a multifactorial etiology and is a global public health problem which also affects Mexican population. Obesity is characterized by excessive body adiposity, as well as high prevalence of diverse comorbidities, which diminish life quality. Sedentary lifestyle and hypercaloric food overconsumption are amongst the causes of obesity. It has been suggested that some traits seen in obese patients may represent an addictive behavior, similar to those observed in substance-dependent patients.

Objective. The aim of this work was the validation of the Spanish version of the Yale Food Addiction Rating Scale (YFAS) in a Mexican adult population sample.

Method. The scale was applied twice to 160 participants with a three weeks period in-between. The factorial model was corroborated with Bartlett’s sphericity test and with that of Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin.

Results. Internal consistency was calculated by means of Cronbach’s alpha which was α = 0.7963; reliability, measured with Spearman’s coefficient by means of the test-retest method, was r = 0.565, n = 96. Convergence validity was estimated using the Binge Eating Scale (BES) and Spearman’s correlation (r = 0.5868 p ≤ 0.0001; n = 157). Bartlett’s sphericity test showed (χ2(300) = 1572.33, p < 0.05) and that of Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO = 0.825), showing consistency for the factorial model. Spearman’s correlation between YFAS and body mass index (BMI) showed r = 0.2843 p ≤ 0.001; n = 151.

Discussion and conclusion. The Spanish version of the YFAS showed psychometric properties not different from the original and adapted existing versions. Therefore, YFAS Spanish version could be useful in healthcare and clinical research in Mexican population.


Keywords


Obesity; addictive behavior; validation study